A Medic Alert Saves Young People Too!

I’m appropriate for a “Medic Alert?”

But, I’m not falling and I’m not old!

When you think about a “medic alert,” you typically think of an “elder person who is falling.”  This, of course, is because the industry has trained us to think that way!  (ie “Help!  …I can’t get up!”)

The following CDC statistics also supports that idea: 

  • 1 in 3 Seniors (65+) WILL FALL this year!  
  • 50% of those who fall CANNOT get back up….
  • Two-thirds of those that fall will do so again within 6 months.  
  • The chances of surviving a fall are 6 times greater IF the person is found within the hour.
  • Falls are the leading cause of death from injury among people 65 and older.

With those scary statistics, therefore, it’s no wonder that we have reinforcement to confirm the thought that you have to be elderly AND falling to be appropriate for a “button.”  We ALL know that.  Right?  Right!

However, did you ever stop to think that you don’t have to be elderly and/or falling to be appropriate?  

The Leading Causes of Death are Fairly Consistent.

Did you know, for instance, that approximately 74% of all deaths in the United States occur as a result of only 10 causes? The 2019 data from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) suggests that the main causes of death in the U.S. have remained fairly consistent. They are as follows:

  1. Heart disease
  2. Cancer
  3. Unintentional injuries (Accidents)
  4. Chronic lower respiratory disease
  5. Stroke and cerebrovascular diseases
  6. Alzheimer’s disease
  7. Diabetes
  8. Kidney disease
  9. Influenza and pneumonia
  10. Suicide

So, when you consider all of the above “causes of death,” you realize that most have no age requirement

At this point, let us take a moment to think about individuals in our lives who could potentially benefit from the peace of mind a PERS (Personal Emergency Response System) provides. A medic alert SAVES LIVES!  

Unfortunately, Death Can Occur at Any Age.

Thus, our focus is on individuals who have health issues that would warrant immediate medical attention in an emergent situation — regardless of age!  In an emergency, therefore, being able to get help quickly could be the difference between life and death! 

Likewise, Medical Conditions Can Occur at Any Age.

Collectively, we can explore this sad, but true, fact. Unfortunately, we do not have to be old to be sick!

Heart Disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women — in the U.S. and worldwide.

Cancer is a risk to everyone to a degree, but for most cancers, the risk will increase with age.

Accidents, or unintentional injuries, are the leading cause of death for those aged 1–44.

Chronic lower respiratory disease refers to a group of lung conditions that block the airflow and cause breathing-related issues. These diseases include:

  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • bronchitis
  • emphysema
  • asthma

Cerebrovascular diseases develop due to problems with the blood vessels that supply the brain. The four most common cerebrovascular diseases are stroke, transient ischemic attack, or mini stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and vascular dementia.

Dementia refers to a group of conditions that cause a decline in cognitive function. This affects a person’s ability to perform everyday activities. In turn, this can lead to changes in memory, behavior, and the ability to think clearly. Alzheimers disease is just one type of dementia. Alzheimer’s is also the only cause of death in the top 10 that medical experts cannot cure, prevent, or slow down.

Diabetes is a condition wherein the body can no longer control blood glucose, which leads to dangerously high levels of blood glucose. This is called hyperglycemia. It can cause serious health complications, including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and the need for amputation of the lower extremities.

Influenza, or flu, is a highly contagious viral infection. It is one of the most severe illnesses of the winter season. Pneumonia, a serious condition that causes inflammation of the lungs, can cause complications in people who have the flu.

Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) causes kidney damage. Damaged kidneys cannot filter blood as well as healthy kidneys. As a result of this, waste from the blood remains in the body and may lead to other health problems.

When a person dies by suicide, they may or may not have lived with a mental health condition — such as depression, anxiety, or bipolar disorder — for a long time. Sadly, suicide is the second-leading cause of death among people aged 10-34 years.

But, I’m Too Young to Need a Medic Alert!

Do you, or someone you know, have any of the aforementioned health conditions?  

After considering the fact that a medic alert system could help ANYONE at ANY AGE to maintain their safety AND independence, wouldn’t it would be ideal to put that protection in place? Remember, in closing, that EVEN IF YOU CANNOT SPEAK, you can get help simply by pushing your button!!!

Around the Clock Medical Alarms has been a medic alert system provider since 2012.  

In closing, let us help you, or someone you know — Around the Clock — regardless of age!

 

 

The Happiness Equation: How to be happy in old age!

Active social life – whether this is going to a museum or a movie, or taking a walk, social activity reduces isolation and loneliness which is very destructive for older people.
 
Who you live with – connecting with younger generations, being socially engaged and having good cognitive skills are determining factors in wellbeing in later life. Social interaction is ranked more important than health and money.
 
Physical activity – keeping active is a big contributor in boosting wellbeing.
 
Positive attitude – being up for trying new things and having a positive view on engaging in life are important for mental health.
 
Be protected – a device such as Around the Clock Medical Alarms is not only life saving, but also peace of mind for you and your loved ones.

During the Holidays, Help Protect the Elderly from Falls

Older adults’ risk of falling may have increased during the pandemic due to declines in physical activity and mobility.  Along with increased isolation, a University of Michigan poll shows that many also became more fearful of falling, which, in turn, can increase the risk.

“Taking steps now to reduce fall risk in their homes could prevent catastrophic injury and hospitalization,” said Geoffrey Hoffman, a fall researcher and assistant professor of nursing at the university.

Older people whose mobility declined during the first part of the pandemic were 70% more likely to say they’d had a fall in that time.  Additionally, they are twice as likely to express a fear of falling, the poll revealed.

“Even if an older adult has gotten more active since getting vaccinated, their risk of falling could still be higher than it would have been if the pandemic hadn’t increased their inactivity or isolation,” Hoffman said in a university news release.

He offered some tips on fall-proofing older adults’ homes:

11 Ways to Prevent Falls during the Holiday

Rugs and mats: Cut pieces of non-skid material to fit underneath small throw rugs and mats. If they already have non-skid material, check that it still grips the floor. Throw rugs/mats should only be used on bare floors, not on top of carpet. Make sure bath mats have rubber backing in good condition.

Furniture placement: Offer to help move furniture and other objects to create wider walking paths.

Bathrooms: A grab rail in the tub/shower is a good idea.  In addition, a rubber mat with suction cups or a stool with non-skid feet is also good. If possible, a walk-in shower is much better than a tub.

Lighting: Dark hallways, stairways, closets with high shelves and outdoor steps are fall risk areas. Install brighter light bulbs or new fixtures that take multiple bulbs. Also, add motion sensors so lights come on automatically when someone enters the area.  You might also consider night lights that come on when it gets dark or have a motion sensor.

Safe reaching: Encourage use of a folding step stool that has multiple steps and a high hand rail instead of a small stool or chair.   When seniors want to reach things on high shelves or change a light bulb, clock or smoke/carbon monoxide detector batteries, they need to have a sturdy base.

Sensible storage: Occasionally, help them reorganize storage to place items on lower shelves.

Railings and steps: Check railings on stairways and porch steps to make sure they’re securely anchored. If steps can become slippery, add stick-on traction strips.

Seasonal decor: Offer to bring holiday decorations and lights from the attic, an upstairs room or basement, and to help put them up.

Ice problems: Make sure older adults have a good supply of de-icer or sand to use on steps, walkways and driveways. For those who can’t easily lift a heavy jug, transfer the de-icer or sand to a container with a lid and add a scoop so they can scatter it more easily.

Snow removal: Make sure their snowblower is in good working order and that shovels, car scrapers and brushes are close at hand and in good shape. If an older person uses a shovel, it should have a back-saving handle to provide more stability when shoveling and prevent muscle strains.

More outdoor hazards: Make sure outdoor lights work and have automatic sensors. Check doormats to make sure they won’t slip. Clean gutters above entrances so melting snow doesn’t collect on steps and form ice.

More information The U.S. National Institute on Aging has more about falls and fall prevention

Get in the Know!

3 Fun Instragram Accounts for Seniors

If you’re interested in the idea of bite-sized content with interesting pictures and videos, but you’re not sure where to start on Instagram, don’t worry. We’ve created a list of seven accounts from people of all ages, backgrounds and niches for you to check out. From a young family living the RV travel life even during the COVID-19 pandemic to an older British couple relishing the romance of everyday life, you’ll find plenty of options on our list.

1. Pauline & Geoffrey Walker

This lovely British couple has been married since 1951. The account, @geoffreywalk, is mostly run by Geoffrey, who gives short Bible and faith talks, shows off his garden and talks followers through making easy recipes such as jacket potatoes. He often features Pauline, who might be crafting something clever or enjoying an outing with him. 

2. Jerry Rosenblum

This 98-year old is living a vibrant life singing, performing and writing a book. He also calls on others to be kind to each other. You can follow him at @jerry_rosenblum to see what he gets up to thanks to Katie, who helps him run his Instagram account.

3. Belinda Donner

Belinda is 52 years old, so she’s technically not yet a senior citizen. But her @younglikeb Instagram has something for people of all ages. “You’re never too old to be young,” reads her profile. She shares captions and images from her life and links to posts on her blog with recipes, health information and other tips.

Time for a Visit!

Moving an aging loved one into an assisted living community represents a huge life change for all those involved. While it will give you peace of mind to know that your loved ones will be safe and well cared for in their new home, they will undoubtedly go through an adjustment period. They will be meeting new people, adapting to a new routine and getting used to a new living space.

Even after your loved one is settled in their new environment, it’s important to remember that scheduling routine visits is vital. Staying social is one of the most important things seniors can do to improve their quality of life, and a simple visit from family members helps ward off that feeling of isolation some seniors experience.

1) Let your loved ones know you care. This may seem obvious, and you may think your loved one already knows how much you care and love them. However, an in-person visit gives you a chance to be affectionate and serves as a reminder that you care about their well-being.

2) Allows you to check up on their health. As you spend time with your loved one, you’ll be able to evaluate their overall physical and emotional health. You can take note to see if anything about them has changed since your last visit. Are they showing any signs of depression or memory loss? Are they maintaining a healthy diet and taking proper medications? You’ll be able to listen carefully to any complaints or problems your loved one might be having, so you can be sure to address your concerns with the staff at the assisted living community.

3) Bring back and create positive memories. By sharing stories of the past and present with your aging loved ones, you’ll help improve their mood and encourage them to engage. You can bring in photo albums or videos, or favorite music to bring back those happy times.  Also, by visiting regularly you’re giving your loved one something to look forward to and creating new memories for the future.

4) Keeps aging loved ones socially connected. As mentioned above, staying social is vital to improve a senior’s quality of life. Keeping socially active can be as beneficial as being physically active! A visit helps your loved one’s emotional and physical health and gives them a sense of belonging.

We Rise by Lifting Others

Kindness Matters

Treating other people well isn’t just good for your karma: It’s also a boost for your mental and physical health. And because small gestures have big importance, practicing kindness is an easy means to support your health.

Here at Around the Clock Medical Alarms we know a thing or two about kindness. Our entire company was started by one of the most sincere and kind people I know; Linda Bass. Her mission is simple, to help people, and that’s what she does each and every day. Looks like karma is definitely on our side!

Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible. - The Dalai Lama

Fall Detection Device

Fall Detection: 4 Essential Parts of a Fall Prevention Plan

Fall Detection: Is it time for your senior to get serious about avoiding a fall?

Aging adults who fall once are twice as likely to fall again, and that next fall can be devastating to your senior’s overall health. Having a fall detection plan is a vital part of ensuring that she’s able to stay as healthy and as independent as possible.

 

Fall Detection Device

Fall Detection Device

 

Remove Clutter

The first thing to do when you and your senior are planning ways to prevent falls is to look at her environment. Take a quick tour through her home and look critically at how much space she has to walk in and whether there is clutter or anything else on the floor that could present a tripping hazard. Put together a plan for clearing as much space as possible as quickly as you can.

Assess Fall Risks

Next, it’s time to talk with your senior’s doctor about her fall risks. This can involve health issues she’s managing, medications that she is taking, and other things like her vision and her hearing. Put together as complete a list as possible of what increases your senior’s likelihood of falling and what reduces those risks. This is going to be a big part of the fall prevention plan.

Consider Exercise

One of the best ways to help your senior to prevent a fall is to find out whether exercise is an option for her. Her doctor may have some specific recommendations. Walking, yoga, or tai chi are great ways for your elderly family member to improve her balance and her strength without wearing herself out. By sticking with a regular exercise plan, she may significantly reduce her fall risk.

Fall Detection: Use a Medical Alarm

Medical alarms that offer fall detection are another critical piece in the plan you’re putting together. These devices work around the clock to immediately get help if your senior does experience a fall. They can be the key to helping your senior to age in place and to maintain her independence for as long as she wants to do so.

Even the best fall prevention plans need to be revised now and again. Take some time to periodically review what’s working with your senior’s fall detection plan and what isn’t. Then assess what needs to be changed so that the plan is more likely to be effective for her. If you do this a few times a year, you’ll be able to be proactive about adjusting for changes as they happen.

 

If you or an aging loved-one are considering choosing Fall Detection in South County, MO, please contact the friendly staff at Around The Clock Medical Alarms.
Call Us: 877.449.5566

Senior Care Spotlight: Transitions for Senior Living

Senior Care: Have you been stressed about the care and safety of an aging loved one?

 

 

Not sure you understand all the care levels available or what care is needed?

Did you know there is a free, unbiased service that can personally walk you through the process? Transitions For Senior Living has been working in the St. Louis area for 10 years, helping families in your same situation, we care and can give you the peace of mind that you are making the best decision possible.

MAKE THE CALL…(it’s easy!)
Phone us, we will respond as soon as possible, we know this was a tough call to make and we don’t want you to wait. If you want to find out more about Transitions Team, check out our website: TransitionsForSeniorLiving.com and fill out our inquiry form.

⦁ PHONE CONVERSATION
Our first conversation will help us understand your family’s physical, cognitive, and social care needs, answer your questions, and set up a time to meet in person. 

⦁ PERSONAL CONSULTATION
At our meeting, we’ll discuss various care options that might be the best fit for your loved one, taking into consideration physical and social care needs, geographic preference, and budget. If placement is not an immediate need, we’ll discuss other resources, connect you with trusted care partners to ensure the safety and comfort for your loved one.

⦁ YOUR PLAN
Together we will create a plan with a clear understanding of timeline and next steps. We will be with you through every step of the process. Our services are personalized because every situation is unique.

⦁ COMMUNITY OR CARE AT HOME OPTIONS
When we identify the top 3 to 5 communities, whether independent, assisted, memory care or skilled nursing, we’ll schedule tours, accompany you to each community, ask the questions that will give you the most comprehensive understand of the care each community will provide, be an advocate, answer questions, and help make a smooth transition.

⦁ ONGOING SUPPORT
Once care has been established, we will follow up to ensure that your expectations of the care, comfort, and safety needs of your loved one are being met. We can help with connecting you to trusted partners for elder attorneys, financial planners, real estate agents, day programs, move managers, and in-home care.

So, whether in crisis-mode or planning ahead we can help, we have comprehensive knowledge, experience and connections for all facets senior care and can help you. We want to give you the education and understanding to make the best choice for your loved ones the first time.  

Transitions For Senior Living is a free, unbiased, family service that has been helping families, over the past 10 years, to personally help families with all their care needs. We have a wide range of trusted partners from financial planners, elder care attorneys, in-home care services, medical alert systems, and veteran’s benefit planning. Give one of our Senior Care Advocates a call and we will personally meet with you and your family to understand your physical, cognitive, financial, and social care needs, pare down the options and tour appropriate communities with you, Completely free of Charge.  

Guest Article Contributed by Sharon Balleau, .  

Contact us:
Sharon Balleau –
314-606-8531

Carmen Worley – 314-960-0519

TransitionsForSeniorLiving.com

 

 

 

If you or an aging loved-one are considering choosing Medical Alarms in St. Louis, MO, please contact the friendly staff at Around The Clock Medical Alarms.
Call Us: 877.449.5566

 

Medication Dispenser

Medication Dispenser: Four Tips for Being Proactive with Your Senior’s Medications

Medication Dispenser: Medications serve a valuable purpose, but they can also create complications for your elderly family member in terms of side effects, interactions, and more.

As her family caregiver, it’s crucial that you have a plan that allows your senior to take her medication as prescribed and that she’s as safe as possible when taking her medications. A medication dispenser may be something to consider.

 

Medication Dispenser

Medication Dispenser

Schedule Regular Medication Reviews with Her Doctor

Medication reviews can help your senior and her doctor to reduce her fall risk and ensure that she’s taking the right medications in the right dosages for her. Medication reviews are especially helpful if they’re done on a regular basis, even if your senior’s medications haven’t changed. Your senior’s internal chemistry can change, necessitating a change in either medication or dosage.

Talk to Her Pharmacist about How Foods Affect Her Medications

Another excellent resource when it comes to your senior and her medications is her pharmacist. It’s especially important to talk to your senior’s pharmacist about how food can interact with medications. For instance, some blood pressure medications can’t be taken with grapefruit or grapefruit juice or it will cause problems for your senior. It’s important to know those interactions.

Try to Fill All Prescriptions at the Same Pharmacy

That said, it’s a lot easier to keep up with possible medication interactions if your elderly family member gets all of her prescriptions filled at the same pharmacy. Pharmacies keep track of all the different medications that their customers take, along with any information about adverse reactions and other important information. This gives the pharmacist a bird’s eye view of all the medications that your senior takes and how they might impact her. That can be crucial when it comes to keeping your senior safe.

Use a Medication Dispenser

When you have a medication dispenser for your senior, it’s easy to load up and easy to use. Even better, your aging family member and you are able to see easily whether she’s already taken her medications or still needs to do so. The right medication dispenser can also make taking medications so much easier for your elderly family member because she doesn’t have to think about which medicines she needs to take.
Staying on top of your senior’s medications is an important and sometimes complicated task. It’s worth every bit of effort, though, and it’s vital to take advantage of tools that make that task easier for you both.

 

If you or an aging loved-one are considering choosing a Medication Dispenser in St. Louis, MO, please contact the friendly staff at Around The Clock Medical Alarms.
Call Us: 877.449.5566

Choices for Senior Adult Independence

This is the time of year when we in America celebrate our independence.

Our country’s declaration of independence from Britain in 1776 was the idea to become independent from the “world superpower” of that time. Our forefathers fought and won against overwhelming odds. Today, many of the “Great Generation” of senior adults are in a battle to remain independent and in their homes. Many have lived in that home for decades and the thought of having to leave it can be an emotional battle seeming fought against overwhelming odds. This article is a tool to perhaps help families engage in conversations that might help determine if a change in lifestyle is needed.

There are basically 7 options for senior living today and this article will briefly explain them.


Aging in Place (in their home or a family member’s home)

In a recent survey conducted by AARP nearly 90 percent of people over the age of 65 want to stay in their home for as long as possible, and 80 percent believe their current residence is where they will always live. However, for aging seniors to age in place their physical, financial, and care environments must be accommodating. A quote by Robyn Stone, (Executive director of the LeadingAge Center for Applied Research) puts it this way: “Most people are doing that until they aren’t doing it … it’s only when they reach either a crisis or a change in their condition or functional status, or in many times, the family support that they can no longer remain in their homes.” Such a crisis or change often happens after the age of 85. A home that lacks bedrooms, bathrooms, and laundry rooms on the first floor for example is just one of several barriers to aging in place. There are options to help finance home modifications such as a second mortgage or a reverse mortgage, but for low-income households and even many middle-income households paying to age in place is a serious challenge.

 

The Village Concept

The Village movement is a nationwide network of non-profit membership organizations. Members pay a fee for access to and help with local services including transportation, handyman services, help with household tasks, and organized social activities. On average it costs about $50/month or $600/year. A Village works just like a concierge service. A member needing a service would be connected to Village members who donate their time or volunteers who are vetted and trained. The Village concept is not yet widely available and many communities and would require a strong commitment of support from many businesses and services to be successful. Hopefully, it can be developed in many areas of the country.


 

Independent Living

This is defined as any housing designed exclusively for seniors, usually retirement communities, retirement homes, senior housing, and senior apartments. In general, the housing is compact, easy to navigate, and includes help with outdoor maintenance. The cost is medium to high depending on the location and services offered. Average costs range from $1500 to $10,000/month.

Residential Home Care

These are small facilities that offer personalized service to small groups of senior adults. They are often known as family homes, board and care homes, or personal care homes. They provide lodging, meal services, and assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs). These can often be half the cost of nursing homes but again, are not widely available in all communities.

 

Continuing Care Retirement Communities

These communities are part independent living, part assisted living and part skilled nursing facility. Residents can start out in the independent living section and move to different parts of the community as they need increasing levels of care. The cost of this option is high. CCRCs are the most expensive of all long-term care options.

 

Assisted Living Community

These communities consist of small apartments where older adults can live somewhat independently but require some assistance. Typical services include a staff available 24 hours a day, meals, medication management, bathing, dressing, housekeeping, and transportation. Again, costs are high and vary according to the level of daily help required and type of living space needed.

 

Nursing Home/Skilled Nursing Facility

This option is for older adults who need 24-hour supervised care with medications, activities, and overall health management. This facility is to care for those adults with debilitating physical or mental illness and are unable to care for themselves. A licensed physician supervises each resident’s care and a nurse or other medical professional is always on the premises. Costs are high and are according to the level of daily help required.

 

At Around the Clock Medical Alarms, we remain committed to assisting families to keep their loved ones in their homes for as long as possible. When it becomes time for a change in their living condition, we are able to assist them in Independent and Community Living Facilities where “pull cords” are the method of obtaining help. Often, they need help in areas of the apartment or home where the cords are not accessible. Our subscribers are able to get help in any living area and often coverage for the entire campus. We stand ready to help families fight for their ability to remain independent for as long as possible by getting them the help they need at the touch of a button.

No matter where you live, a medic alert system can help to maintain your independence and safety!  If you have questions about a PERS device, feel free to give us a call at 573-334-7233.

Article contributed by Les Tainter, Area Manager, Around the Clock Medical Alarms.

 

If you or an aging loved-one are considering choosing Medical Alarms in Cape Girardeau, MO, please contact the friendly staff at Around The Clock Medical Alarms.
Call Us: 877.449.5566